How to thread a singer simple sewing machi

How to thread a singer simple sewing machi

The Singer Simple 3116 is a beginning level sewing machine equipped with several easy-to-use features, including an automatic needle threader. Threading the machine is a fairly straightforward process, but you do need to make sure that the right steps are done in the right order.

The flat bobbin-case spring exerts pressure on the thread as it comes out of the bobbin case. The amount of pressure is regulated by a small screw at the rear of the spring. Both the spring and screw are easy to locate when the machine has a separate bobbin case. When the machine has a drop-in bobbin with a built-in bobbin case, locating the tension screw can be more challenging. Both types are shown in the drawings below. In either case, to increase the resistance, use a small screwdriver to turn the screw clockwise (to a higher number) or counterclockwise (to a lower number). Turn the screw in small increments and never more than a quarter-turn between tests. This helps you keep track of how much you’re changing your settings and reduces the risk of losing this tiny screw.

• Damaged machine parts: Bent needles and bobbins, and rough or damaged surfaces on the needle eyes, thread guides, tension discs, take-up lever, throat plate, presser foot, bobbin case, and in the bobbin area can all cause problems. If you drop a metal bobbin on a hard floor, throw it away, even if it looks fine; the smallest damage can distort tension. Avoid damage to the bobbin-tension spring by cutting the thread close to the case before removing the bobbin. Raise the presser foot before removing thread from the upper tension.

Search Add New Question Question My machine is threaded but not sewing. What is wrong? Community Answer Your bobbin might not be in place correctly. Make sure the presser foot is down to feeders, and the machine is plugged in and on. Make sure the foot feed is plugged in. It could be a number of things. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 5 Helpful 4 Question My machine is not raising the bobbin thread. What should I do? T. Chinsen Top Answerer Make sure the bobbin is placed correctly in the bobbin case. The thread must be pulled through the slit in the bobbin case until it moves freely, then place the bobbin into the machine. Hold the end of the upper thread that goes through the needle. When the wheel is turned, it will pick up the lower thread and be looped over the upper thread. Tug the end you were holding to pull the lower thread all the way up. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 1 Question Once I got the bobbin in, the needle wouldn’t move. How do I release the needle? T. Chinsen Top Answerer If you placed thread on the bobbin, you need to switch the machine back to sewing mode. In the article: Unlock the spindle by pushing it back to the left. Note that the machine will not sew until the bobbin winding spindle is back in its left position. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 1 Question What do I do if after threading the machine, I start to sew and the needle only goes up and down and doesn’t make a line of stitches? Community Answer Turn on the feed dogs. Switch on the bottom of the machine. Feed dogs need to come up to move the fabric. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0

In either case, the tension regulator is elementary: When adjusted to a higher number (turned clockwise), the discs move closer together, increasing the amount of pressure. Turned to a lower number (counterclockwise), the discs move apart, decreasing the pressure. Using a thicker thread without resetting the dial will increase the pressure and cause the upper thread flow to decrease, unless you’ve got a newer machine that makes automatic upper-tension adjustments. Since the bobbin tension is not self-adjusting, the lower tension may need to be adjusted manually to match.

Whenever you switch from your standard sewing thread to another thread, first thread your sewing machine and test your setup to see if you can get away with a tension-dial-only, temporary adjustment. If that doesn’t work, get out your second bobbin case, and start moving the screw in quarter-turns to loosen or tighten it, as your sample dictates. Typically, when you use a lighter-than-normal thread for both needle and bobbin, the tensions will stay balanced, even though they’re both lighter. This is often just what you need to avoid puckering lightweight fabrics, so no adjustment may be necessary. A heavier thread in top and bottom will increase both tensions, and you’ll probably need to set a lighter tension to accommodate heavier fabrics.

Best Portable: Magicfly Mini Sewing Machine Buy on Amazon If you want to sew with friends, attend classes, or just generally be able to move your sewing machine from point A to point B, a portable machine is a must. These machines are also ideal if you don’t want to take up too much space, and only really sew occasionally. This mini machine has two speeds, a small collection of accessories, and an extension table for bigger projects. It’s got beginner-friendly features, like an easy threading option. You can plug it in, or power it with batteries (handy if you’re in a location that doesn’t have outlets available). The 8 Best Steam Irons of 2021

Today’s sewing machines usually require just a few basic steps to keep them in good working order. While the manual included with your machine will spell out the details, it’s important to regularly remove the throat plate and use a small, soft brush to remove thread, lint, and debris that might have become lodged inside the machine. Your machine may also require oiling to keep everything lubricated and running smoothly.

In order to form a row of stitches that looks the same on both sides of the fabric, the same amount of thread needs to flow from the spool and the bobbin simultaneously. This is accomplished by running the threads through various tension devices, including the thread guides, tension discs, and tension regulator on the machine head for the upper thread(s), and the bobbin-case spring for the bobbin thread. Some machines include a small hole in the bobbin-case finger, through which to feed the bobbin thread to increase the tension for improved stitch definition when topstitching, satin-stitching, and embroidering, without touching your tension settings.

Always thread the machine with the presser foot up. As long as the presser foot is up, the thread can seat properly. When the presser foot is down, the tension is engaged and it will not allow the thread to seat as it should. If the thread is not seated in the tension disks, it cannot engage any tension on the thread and stitch malfunctions are bound to happen.

Best Overall: SINGER M1500 Mechanical Sewing Machine Buy on Amazon Buy on Walmart This Singer sewing machine comes with everything a beginner could need to get started, including an instructional DVD and 57 easy stitch patterns. The machine is equipped with a built-in needle threader and the ability to switch stitches and also adjust their width and size. It also comes with over 65 helpful accessories, including a seam ripper, all-purpose foot, needle plate screwdriver, and a pack of needles and bobbins. Users will go from having no sewing experience to sewing up masks and on to bigger projects like curtains and outfits in no time. The 7 Best Sewing Machines of 2021

If the needle is correct, is it possible you have bent it? The needle is part of the upper threading and is a very inexpensive part to replace. Always remember to let the feed dogs do the work. If you are pulling the fabric to the back of the machine rather than letting the machine feed it through, you risk bending the sewing machine needle which can lead to all kinds of sewing problems.

Tangling Caused by Improper Threading ClarkandCompany / Getty Images A massive nest of tangled thread is usually a result of the sewing machine being improperly threaded. Just because the tangled mess is on the bobbin side of the stitching, don’t assume the fault lies with the bobbin. To correct this problem, put the presser foot up and unthread the sewing machine entirely. Rethread the machine with the presser foot up. Follow your sewing machine manual to make sure you are guiding the thread through all of the guides in the proper fashion. One of the most common mistakes people make is to thread a sewing machine with the presser foot down. This causes the tension disks to be engaged or tight, preventing the thread from seating properly between the disks.

Rotate the needle. Turn the hand wheel at the side of the machine toward you. Continue until the needle goes through a full rotation, lowering into the machine and rising back out to its highest position. X Research source For the sake of safety, it is best to do this while the machine is off. The presser foot should also be raised during this procedure. As you turn the wheel, you should see a loop of thread appear through the needle plate hole beneath the needle. This loop of thread is from the bobbin.

If you’re lucky, you’ll find a repair guy who will let you watch what he does. Not likely your machine breaks again, but if it does, yo’ll know what he did to fix it. IF you’re handy with tools (and can find the repair book for the machine) you’ll remember what he did, and better, keep your machine running like the techs!!! 😉

T. Chinsen Top Answerer Make sure the bobbin is placed correctly in the bobbin case. The thread must be pulled through the slit in the bobbin case until it moves freely, then place the bobbin into the machine. Hold the end of the upper thread that goes through the needle. When the wheel is turned, it will pick up the lower thread and be looped over the upper thread. Tug the end you were holding to pull the lower thread all the way up. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 1

Sewing machine models vary in size, ranging from compact mini-machines to full-size models that may offer more power and features. When deciding what size sewing machine is right for you, consider where you plan to use and store your machine. A mini sewing machine with a small footprint is ideal when you’re short on crafting or storage space. On the other hand, if you have a designated sewing area and are looking for a full-featured machine, then a standard-sized sewing machine will give you all the options. This type of machine might also have a larger table area that makes it more suited to larger sewing projects.

• Incorrectly filled bobbin: Remove any thread on the bobbin be-fore you wind on new thread. Wind the bobbin following the machine instructions, so it’s evenly wound at the proper tension. Remove any thread from the outside of the bobbin. Wind at a consistent, slow or medium speed, especially with polyester and nylon threads, to keep them from stretching; they relax in your seam, causing puckers.

The machine’s simplicity is a true perk for beginners—you can learn the core tasks that are required for sewing, without having to delve into a complicated instruction manual or watch multiple YouTube tutorials. Reviewers appreciate that ease of use directly out of the box but feel that the machine has enough features that it’ll grow with them. In fact, several users note that it’s good for beginners and experienced seamstresses alike.

Finally, bring the needle into an accessible position by adjusting the handwheel. Insert the thread. Your sewing machine should be threaded and ready to go, but it’s always a good idea to make a test run on a sample swatch to check your work.

If there is no such setting on your machine, take off the throat plate and clean out all dust, thread, and lint. Oil the machine according to your sewing machine manual. If the feed dogs still do not work, troubleshoot the problem with your sewing machine manual. When all else fails, it may be time to take the machine in for repairs.

The machine includes a stitch selection and length dial, along with a stitch chart, bobbin hook, and other key features. There’s also a convenient storage area underneath the sewing workspace (handy for storing odds and ends).

In addition to guiding the thread along its path, each thread guide exerts a small amount of resistance on the thread, adding to the tension from the discs to achieve balanced tension. Bottom line: Always make sure all guides are threaded before stitching.

Madeleine Vionnet (1876–1975) was a purist. To her, the best designs incorporated four principles: proportion, movement, balance, and truth. I believe these elements are all found in the skirt of…

This Singer sewing machine comes with everything a beginner could need to get started, including an instructional DVD and 57 easy stitch patterns. The machine is equipped with a built-in needle threader and the ability to switch stitches and also adjust their width and size. It also comes with over 65 helpful accessories, including a seam ripper, all-purpose foot, needle plate screwdriver, and a pack of needles and bobbins. Users will go from having no sewing experience to sewing up masks and on to bigger projects like curtains and outfits in no time.

While it’s suitable for children, this machine is also a great option for adults. The lack of bells and whistles is a feature, not a deficit, allowing you to get going on projects right away.

If the thread continues to break after you have checked out these possibilities, thoroughly clean out all dust and lint from the bobbin area and the tension disks. Run your fingers over the path traveled by the thread, looking for any kind of burr, debris, or loose fabric that could cause snags.

Tensions can still need adjustment even if they’re balanced. If both tensions are too tight, the seam may pucker, or break easily when stretched (test this on the more stretchy crossgrain, with at least a 6-inch seam). If both are too loose, the seam will gap when pressed open, exposing the threads between the sections.

Once your stitching is balanced, start a tension log in your sewing-machine manual, indicating the thread brand, size, and type, as well as the number on the upper-tension regulator that produced a balanced stitch. Then draw a picture showing the position of the bobbin screw, like the example below, to use as a reference if you need to record a change in bobbin settings for special threads.

Jammed Machine As dramatic as it may be, jamming is a very common problem for a sewing machine. Your first step toward a remedy is to remove any fabric you were trying to sew. This may require gently tugging at the fabric and lifting it enough that you can snip at the threads and pull the fabric free of the machine. Next, remove all the jammed thread; this may require removing the bobbin, the throat plate, and any other parts to release any jammed threads and get the machine sewing again. Before you start sewing again, check your sewing machine needle. Even a slightly bent needle can cause a thread jam.

Many sewers avoid the tension dials on their sewing machines like the plague, certain they’ll only make matters worse if they make adjustments. In fact, there’s nothing mysterious about setting and adjusting thread tensions on your sewing machine, whatever its make and model. What’s potentially more confusing is that many apparently tension-related problems are caused by factors other than misadjusted tension dials.

Fabric Not Feeding Under the Needle Several issues can cause fabric feed problems. Many sewing machines have a setting that lowers the feed dogs, which is necessary for free-motion sewing. But in normal operation, the feed dogs are what move the fabric under the sewing machine needle. If the feed dogs are not coming up to move the fabric, check to see if there is a setting that has lowered the feed dogs; if so, return them to their proper setting. If there is no such setting on your machine, take off the throat plate and clean out all dust, thread, and lint. Oil the machine according to your sewing machine manual. If the feed dogs still do not work, troubleshoot the problem with your sewing machine manual. When all else fails, it may be time to take the machine in for repairs.

To make a temporary tension adjustment, select the threads for the needle and bobbin, then fill the bobbin and thread the machine. Make a test seam on the fabric that you plan to sew, examine the stitches, then see if you can find a balance using the upper-tension assembly alone.

As with the tension dials, the amount of pressure will be increased when thicker threads are run under the bobbin spring. To eliminate the need to fiddle with the bobbin-case screw, many sewers (myself included) have two bobbin cases: one set for general sewing and the other for adjusting to less frequently used threads.

Several issues can cause fabric feed problems. Many sewing machines have a setting that lowers the feed dogs, which is necessary for free-motion sewing. But in normal operation, the feed dogs are what move the fabric under the sewing machine needle. If the feed dogs are not coming up to move the fabric, check to see if there is a setting that has lowered the feed dogs; if so, return them to their proper setting.

To get started with your sewing project, you’ll need to first thread your sewing machine. While your machine’s manual should guide you in the specific sequence for your make and model, the basic process starts by placing the presser foot in the up position.

If you’re interested in sewing, you’ll need a machine that can whizz through seams, bind together the fabric in a flash, and produce uniform, even stitches. But a quick scan will reveal that there are tons of options. Which machine is right for you? Finding the perfect sewing machine comes down to a few main factors: price, weight, features, and more.

Step on the foot control pedal. Hold the thread tail and gently step on the foot control pedal. The machine should begin to wind the bobbin. If desired, you can let go of the thread tail after the bobbin has wound a few rotations, but doing so is not necessary. The machine should automatically stop once the bobbin is full. Note that the hand wheel should not turn and the machine should not sew while the machine is in its bobbin winding mode.

While sewing machines all fit a basic purpose, the available features vary widely and suit many different project needs. When shopping for a sewing machine, check out which accessories are included—like a presser foot, walking foot for quilting, or other specialty accessories that might fit your project needs. Many people appreciate the convenience of a sewing machine with self-threading capability. Other user-friendly features to consider include task lighting, a drop-in bobbin, or button hole maker.

Breaking or Shredding Thread If you find that the thread breaks every so often, or if it shreds until the machine jams, stop and check out these possibilities: Is the thread getting hung up on the thread spool itself? This could be caused by a nick at the end of the spool or a notch in the spool (designed to secure the end of the thread). You can eliminate the problem by changing the direction the thread feeds off of the spool. Are you using old or low-quality thread? Have a look at what kind of thread you are using, and discard supplies that seem old or of poor quality. Are you using a relatively new sewing machine needle? If the needle has sewn over pins, it may have a nick in it that will play havoc with the thread, causing it to break and shred. There are specialty needles that have a larger path for special threads. If the thread continues to break after you have checked out these possibilities, thoroughly clean out all dust and lint from the bobbin area and the tension disks. Run your fingers over the path traveled by the thread, looking for any kind of burr, debris, or loose fabric that could cause snags.

Madeleine Burry is a health and wellness writer for The Spruce. Her work has been featured in media outlets such as Women’s Health, Livestrong.com, Good Housekeeping, and more.

If you want to sew with friends, attend classes, or just generally be able to move your sewing machine from point A to point B, a portable machine is a must. These machines are also ideal if you don’t want to take up too much space, and only really sew occasionally.

The upper thread keeps on breaking. I have cleaned and oiled the machine and I have changed the needles and the thread. I have a strong feeling that it has something to do with the tension disc and the tension dial. Though I have it on the lowest and loosest setting, it still seems like there’s a lot of tension on the thread. I’m thinking this is why the upper thread is breaking. Is that possible? If so, what should I do? thanks.

This article was edited and researched by Lily Sperry, a lifestyle writer and commerce editor here at The Spruce. When researching picks to recommend, she consulted dozens of customer and third-party reviews, considering quality, ease of use, and affordability.

Quilters have specific needs when it comes to sewing, and this machine delivers. It comes with a walking foot (a must for quilters!), along with an extendable table for draping fabric. It has plenty of beautiful decorative stitches and is available at a budget-friendly price.

Best Manual: Janome 2212 Sewing Machine Buy on Amazon Buy on Walmart Looking for a simple option that’s still incredibly durable? A manual sewing machine can fit the bill. No, you won’t get the on-screen options and settings that come with a computerized version. Still, if you’re sick of looking at screens all day (your phone, the TV, the washing machine, and so on), you’ll appreciate the simplicity of the Janome 2212 Sewing Machine. The machine’s simplicity is a true perk for beginners—you can learn the core tasks that are required for sewing, without having to delve into a complicated instruction manual or watch multiple YouTube tutorials. Reviewers appreciate that ease of use directly out of the box but feel that the machine has enough features that it’ll grow with them. In fact, several users note that it’s good for beginners and experienced seamstresses alike. The machine includes a stitch selection and length dial, along with a stitch chart, bobbin hook, and other key features. There’s also a convenient storage area underneath the sewing workspace (handy for storing odds and ends).

This Singer is lightweight, which is convenient if you envision your child taking it along to sewing classes (or over to grandma’s house). And it offers just the right amount of basic features to get kids started with sewing: It has a stitch selector, a four-step buttonhole maker, a reverse lever, and more basics. Every dial and button is clearly and simply labeled to avoid making users feel overwhelmed.

Best for Embroidery: Husqvarna Viking Jade 20 Sewing Machine Buy on Amazon Buy on Kenssewingcenter.com Buy on Qualitysewing.com This beginner-friendly machine has a guide located in the lid, so you can take a peek if you’re unsure of how to proceed with your fabric type. That’s truly handy if you’re new to sewing since figuring out the correct settings for a project is a process that can take experience and time to master. This Husqvarna Viking Jade has a large embroidery hoop, along with offering 70 built-in embroidery designs and 100+ built-in stitches. As you get more comfortable with the machine, and with embroidering with it, you’ll be able to take advantage of the machine’s software for creating embroidery designs. Another great quality is this machine’s storage—since you can pack up the pedal and power cord, it’s incredibly easy to bring with you on the go while traveling or going to a friend’s. The 9 Best Drawer Organizers of 2021

Remove the bobbin case. Open the hinged cover at the front of the machine and pull the bobbin case straight out. To open the cover, grab it along the side and push it down. The cover will open but will not detach. To remove the bobbin case, pull on the bobbin case tab and lift the case straight toward you.

Position the spool. Place the spool of thread on the spool pin at the top of the machine. Fit the spool cap on the pin next to the spool of thread. You’ll need to lift up the spool pin before you can position the spool of thread on it. For larger spools, the large side of the cap should face the spool. For smaller spools, the small side of the cap should face the spool.

All machines have basically the four tension devices shown: thread guides, tension discs, tension regulator for upper thread, and bobbin-case spring for bobbin thread. These ensure that the same amount of thread flows simultaneously from the needle and the bobbin, producing a symmetrical stitch.

Most people immediately think it’s a sewing machine bobbin problem, but much of the time it has nothing to do with the bobbin and you don’t even need a repair person to fix the problem. If thread is smoothly and evenly wound on the bobbin, the bobbin is not the culprit.

Looking for a simple option that’s still incredibly durable? A manual sewing machine can fit the bill. No, you won’t get the on-screen options and settings that come with a computerized version. Still, if you’re sick of looking at screens all day (your phone, the TV, the washing machine, and so on), you’ll appreciate the simplicity of the Janome 2212 Sewing Machine.

In rare cases, the bobbin can be at fault if it has not been threaded properly. If the thread is not smooth, is uneven, has knots, or is very loose on the bobbin, it has not been threaded correctly. Knowing how to wind a bobbin eliminates this risk.

A bird’s nest of loopy, tangled bobbin thread on the underside of your sewing is one of the most common sewing machine problems to quickly derail any project you’re working on. But don’t panic––this problem is almost always easy to fix. Most people immediately think it’s a sewing machine bobbin problem, but much of the time it has nothing to do with the bobbin and you don’t even need a repair person to fix the problem. If thread is smoothly and evenly wound on the bobbin, the bobbin is not the culprit. The looping bobbin thread is usually caused by the upper threading of the sewing machine. Here are the steps to take to troubleshoot the issue: Thread the Machine Properly Re-thread the upper part of the sewing machine making sure the thread is passing through every single thread guide on its way to the needle. Your sewing machine manual is the best guide on how to thread your particular sewing machine. Always thread the machine with the presser foot up. As long as the presser foot is up, the thread can seat properly. When the presser foot is down, the tension is engaged and it will not allow the thread to seat as it should. If the thread is not seated in the tension disks, it cannot engage any tension on the thread and stitch malfunctions are bound to happen. Change the Needle If you’re still having loopy bobbin thread, change the sewing machine needle. Be sure you are using the proper needle for your brand of machine, the fabric you are sewing, and the job at hand. If the needle is correct, is it possible you have bent it? The needle is part of the upper threading and is a very inexpensive part to replace. Always remember to let the feed dogs do the work. If you are pulling the fabric to the back of the machine rather than letting the machine feed it through, you risk bending the sewing machine needle which can lead to all kinds of sewing problems. Inspect the Bobbin In rare cases, the bobbin can be at fault if it has not been threaded properly. If the thread is not smooth, is uneven, has knots, or is very loose on the bobbin, it has not been threaded correctly. Knowing how to wind a bobbin eliminates this risk. Another thing to check is whether the bobbin is inserted in the bobbin case correctly. Your sewing machine guide is the best resource to check how it should be inserted in the bobbin case. If you do not have the manual for your sewing machine, it is possible to find free sewing machine manuals or replacement manuals online. If your machine uses a case instead of the newer drop-in bobbins, a bobbin is placed into a removable bobbin case so the thread and the slot form an upside-down “V” shape. The thread is then passed under the metal and out the side of the bobbin case. Clean the Machine Still not fixed? How long has it been since you cleaned the machine? Are there wads of lint and thread hiding under or around the bobbin case? Has your upper thread been shredding and possibly leaving pieces in the upper threading path? It’s time to clean out the lint, oil the machine, and do anything else described in your manual as part of routine maintenance for your particular sewing machine model. Related Topics Sewing

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Poor Feed Technique If you find your sewing machine having any of these common problems regularly, take a close look at your technique when operating the machine. Make sure you are letting the feed dogs do the work. Inadvertently forcing the fabric through the machine can bend the needle, which can cause a range of problems.

This particular machine is popular for good reason: It’s reasonably priced but packed with features galore, such as built-in stitches, an automatic needle threader, and an LCD screen. But, the machine is not so complicated that a beginner will feel overwhelmed at needing to read through a thick manual.

Question My machine is not raising the bobbin thread. What should I do? T. Chinsen Top Answerer Make sure the bobbin is placed correctly in the bobbin case. The thread must be pulled through the slit in the bobbin case until it moves freely, then place the bobbin into the machine. Hold the end of the upper thread that goes through the needle. When the wheel is turned, it will pick up the lower thread and be looped over the upper thread. Tug the end you were holding to pull the lower thread all the way up. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 1

What to Look for in a Beginner Sewing Machine Size Sewing machine models vary in size, ranging from compact mini-machines to full-size models that may offer more power and features. When deciding what size sewing machine is right for you, consider where you plan to use and store your machine. A mini sewing machine with a small footprint is ideal when you’re short on crafting or storage space. On the other hand, if you have a designated sewing area and are looking for a full-featured machine, then a standard-sized sewing machine will give you all the options. This type of machine might also have a larger table area that makes it more suited to larger sewing projects. Weight Sewing machine models vary in much how they weigh, with some portable options weighing as little as 3 pounds and other more heavy-duty models weighing up to 30 pounds. The weight of a sewing machine is important to consider since it may affect how portable the machine is. If you plan to take your sewing machine on the go, such as to crafting classes, quilting groups, or a friend’s house, then you may want to look for a sewing machine that is lightweight. The motor and housing are the largest determiners of sewing machine weight. Machines made of mostly metal components will weigh significantly more, but the advantage is often greater durability and more stability when working on large projects or heavy materials. Features While sewing machines all fit a basic purpose, the available features vary widely and suit many different project needs. When shopping for a sewing machine, check out which accessories are included—like a presser foot, walking foot for quilting, or other specialty accessories that might fit your project needs. Many people appreciate the convenience of a sewing machine with self-threading capability. Other user-friendly features to consider include task lighting, a drop-in bobbin, or button hole maker. FAQs How do I thread a sewing machine? To get started with your sewing project, you’ll need to first thread your sewing machine. While your machine’s manual should guide you in the specific sequence for your make and model, the basic process starts by placing the presser foot in the up position. Next, put your thread spool on the spool holder and bring the thread across the top of the machine, through the thread guide. Insert the thread through the tension mechanism, sliding it between the metal disks before pulling it back upwards. Find the take-up lever and place the thread into the hole. Pull the thread towards the sewing machine needle, using available thread guides as you go. Finally, bring the needle into an accessible position by adjusting the handwheel. Insert the thread. Your sewing machine should be threaded and ready to go, but it’s always a good idea to make a test run on a sample swatch to check your work. What should I know about manual versus electric sewing machines? Manual sewing machines were the mainstay of the crafting world, but in more recent years electric (also known as computerized) machines have been increasing in popularity for their easy operation and advanced functions, such as embroidery. If you’re looking for a simple sewing experience without frills, a mechanical machine gives you straightforward functionality. Without electronic components, some feel that these machines prove more reliable in the long-term. However, computerized machines may shorten the learning curve for some new sewers, since choosing stitches and settings only requires the push of a button. What type of maintenance do sewing machines need? Today’s sewing machines usually require just a few basic steps to keep them in good working order. While the manual included with your machine will spell out the details, it’s important to regularly remove the throat plate and use a small, soft brush to remove thread, lint, and debris that might have become lodged inside the machine. Your machine may also require oiling to keep everything lubricated and running smoothly. Why Trust The Spruce? This article was edited and researched by Lily Sperry, a lifestyle writer and commerce editor here at The Spruce. When researching picks to recommend, she consulted dozens of customer and third-party reviews, considering quality, ease of use, and affordability.

The tension discs and tension regulator together are called the tension assembly. The tension discs squeeze the thread as it passes between them, while the tension regulator controls the amount of pressure on the discs. On older machines, there are only two tension discs, controlled by a screw or knob. On newer models there are three discs controlled by a dial or key pad on the front of the machine, which can regulate two threads at once.

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Set the stitch length for 2 mm (12 stitches per inch) or for the length you expect to use most frequently. Set the upper-tension regulator at the middle of its range (on most machines, this is 4 or 5), and stitch a test seam on two layers of lightweight muslin, then examine the stitches. If necessary, use a magnifier to see the stitches clearly. If the tension isn’t perfect, fix it by adjusting the bobbin spring; tighter if the bobbin thread shows on the upper layer, and looser if the needle thread shows on the underlayer. Make another test seam, and examine the stitches, repeating until the stitch is balanced.

I don’t know if my problem is tension-related or not: when I start to sew, the stop motion knob spins free and when I lift the presser foot & remove the fabric, I find several threads @ 3 inches long looped on the bottom of the fabric instead of just a single bobbin thread. The troubleshooting list at the back of my sewing machine book does not address this problem. Could you at least identify the problem for me? If possible, I would also appreciate an explanation of how to solve the problem.

If you’re still having loopy bobbin thread, change the sewing machine needle. Be sure you are using the proper needle for your brand of machine, the fabric you are sewing, and the job at hand.

Hi there kaylaesq. I was having the same problems, and my instruction book didn’t mention this problem, either. I thought maybe it was the thread I was using. I had a coated thread on both the upper thread and the bobbin. I think all the coating affected how the threads gripped one another. Changing the type of thread on at least one of them fixed this for me.

To make a basic adjustment, select contrasting colors of a thread in the brand, size, and fiber you use most frequently. Use one color to fill the bobbin, with the machine set on medium speed to reduce the risk of stretching the thread. Insert a new needle in the size you use most frequently and thread the machine, using all the thread guides on the machine head, but skip threading the eye on the bobbin-case finger if you have that feature.

Next, put your thread spool on the spool holder and bring the thread across the top of the machine, through the thread guide. Insert the thread through the tension mechanism, sliding it between the metal disks before pulling it back upwards. Find the take-up lever and place the thread into the hole. Pull the thread towards the sewing machine needle, using available thread guides as you go.

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• Dirty machine: Lint and thread ends lodged between the tension discs, under the throat plate, or around the bobbin case and bobbin, increase the resistance and restrict the thread flow. “Floss” between the tension discs with a lightweight, lint-free cloth, and check in the bobbin area for thread ends and lint.

How to thread the top of a machine varies from machine model to machine model.  It’s best to check your machine instruction manual for specific details for your specific machine.  However, there are some general tips to keep in mind when threading the top of your machine.  For more tips on successful sewing, check out our blog on top troubleshooting tips. Always, always raise the presser foot lifter before you start threading the machine. Make sure the thread is properly placed in the take-up lever of the machine.   Use a spool cap to help prevent the thread from getting caught on any irregularities that might be on the thread spool itself.  If your machine model comes with multiple sizes of spool caps, use the spool cap that most closely fits the size of the thread spool being used. Make sure that you are using the correct size and style of the needle for the fabric you are sewing.  The wrong size or style of needle can cause your thread to shred or break.   Here are some examples: Main Configuration Alternate Configuration Curvy Configuration Futura Configuration  

Skipped Stitches The most common cause of a sewing machine skipping stitches is using the wrong type of needle for the fabric you are sewing. The simplest rule of thumb is that a knit fabric requires a ballpoint needle, and woven fabric requires a sharp needle—but of course, there is more to it than that. If the machine is sewing fine and you find yourself changing the needle very frequently, you should make sure you are allowing the machine to feed the fabric and that you are not forcing the fabric through the sewing process. Skipped stitches can also result if the needle is bent, which can occur if you are forcing the fabric, rather than let the machine feed it automatically. A sewing machine needle is the smallest and usually one of the least expensive parts of a sewing machine to replace; you owe it to yourself to understand everything about sewing machine needles.

As dramatic as it may be, jamming is a very common problem for a sewing machine. Your first step toward a remedy is to remove any fabric you were trying to sew. This may require gently tugging at the fabric and lifting it enough that you can snip at the threads and pull the fabric free of the machine. Next, remove all the jammed thread; this may require removing the bobbin, the throat plate, and any other parts to release any jammed threads and get the machine sewing again.

Best for Quilting: Brother XR3774 Sewing and Quilting Machine Buy on Amazon Buy on Walmart Quilters have specific needs when it comes to sewing, and this machine delivers. It comes with a walking foot (a must for quilters!), along with an extendable table for draping fabric. It has plenty of beautiful decorative stitches and is available at a budget-friendly price. While this Brother machine is incredibly beginner-friendly, long-term sewers will also be able to use it for years. The Best Quilts of 2021

Sewing machines routinely have many of the same problems, which means they are easily anticipated and usually have established methods of repairing them. Other problems are unique to specific machines, and the fixes may be particular to the brand and model, so it is best to have the manual for your sewing machine on hand as the first reference. To one degree or another, most sewing machines are susceptible to these six common problems.

Question Once I got the bobbin in, the needle wouldn’t move. How do I release the needle? T. Chinsen Top Answerer If you placed thread on the bobbin, you need to switch the machine back to sewing mode. In the article: Unlock the spindle by pushing it back to the left. Note that the machine will not sew until the bobbin winding spindle is back in its left position. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 1

This article is very well written and I want to thank you for it. I will print this and post it by my machine. I have a Baby Lock Quilter’s Choice Professional on a New Joy Gold Standard frame. I have always experienced alot of thread breakage and I get so frustrated with it and will walk away from it for days. I have 6 shirt quilts to quilt and Im not looking forward to it. I was experiencing my top thread showing on back, but I finally got that balances out. Now my bobbin thread is showing on top. Ugh! I will work on balance that tonight. back to the thread breaking. I have tried different thread, different needles. I have threaded, unthreaded and rethreaded to no avail. I keep having the same issue. Im almost convinced now, it may be the way the thread is on the spindle. I noticed that when I have the presser foot up and I pull the thread thru, that it is smooth until more thread comes off the spool, then it almost jerk and releases smooth again. Any thoughts?? If you can help solve my ongoing problem, you will have a friend for life!! THANKS SO MUCH!!

How to thread the top of a machine varies from machine model to machine model.  It’s best to check your machine instruction manual for specific details for your specific machine.  However, there are some general tips to keep in mind when threading the top of your machine.  For more tips on successful sewing, check out our blog on top troubleshooting tips.

Looking for a gift? Gifting a sewing machine early on can lead to a lifelong habit that’s incredibly useful. Of course, any young sewer will need supervision (needles can be sharp, and a real sewing machine is not a toy).

Make sure the bobbin is placed correctly in the bobbin case. The thread must be pulled through the slit in the bobbin case until it moves freely, then place the bobbin into the machine. Hold the end of the upper thread that goes through the needle. When the wheel is turned, it will pick up the lower thread and be looped over the upper thread. Tug the end you were holding to pull the lower thread all the way up.

But of course, that doesn’t mean you want something disposable or poorly made. That’s where the HAITRAL Mini Sewing Machine comes in. It’s petite and lightweight, but durable too. And, it has all the basics you’d expect: two speeds, lighting to make it easy to see what you’re sewing, a thread cutter, and more.

When the tensions are balanced, the stitched line looks good on both sides of the fabric, as shown at the top of the illustration below, and the seam is at its strongest and most elastic. The easiest way to spot unbalanced tension is to look for visible knots or loops at the end of each stitch. When the bobbin thread shows on the right side, the needle tension is too tight or the bobbin thread, too loose, as shown at left in the illustration below. When the needle thread shows on the wrong side, the needle tension is too loose or the bobbin thread, too tight, as shown at right in the illustration below. Of course, if you’re sewing on thin or lightweight fabrics, both threads may show on both sides when the tension is balanced, simply because the fabric is so thin.

Set the bobbin in place. Place the bobbin on the bobbin winding spindle, located to the far right of the machine. Lock the spindle in place. The tail of thread should still stick out through the top of the bobbin. To lock the spindle in place, push the bobbin as far to the right as it will go. This sets the machine to its “bobbin winding” mode.

This Husqvarna Viking Jade has a large embroidery hoop, along with offering 70 built-in embroidery designs and 100+ built-in stitches. As you get more comfortable with the machine, and with embroidering with it, you’ll be able to take advantage of the machine’s software for creating embroidery designs.

If you’re interested in sewing, you’ll need a machine that can whizz through seams, bind together the fabric in a flash, and produce uniform, even stitches. But a quick scan will reveal that there are tons of options. Which machine is right for you? Finding the perfect sewing machine comes down to a few main factors: price, weight, features, and more. To help you make the right decision, here are the best beginner sewing machines on the market.

If you’re looking for a simple sewing experience without frills, a mechanical machine gives you straightforward functionality. Without electronic components, some feel that these machines prove more reliable in the long-term. However, computerized machines may shorten the learning curve for some new sewers, since choosing stitches and settings only requires the push of a button.

• Needles, threads, and fabrics: Different thread sizes and types on top and in the bobbin can throw off basic tension settings. A needle that’s too large or small for the thread can also unbalance your stitches, because the size of the hole adds to or reduces the total top tension. If you find that you’re getting puckers on organza, chiffon, jersey, lace, or blouse-weight silks or polyesters, try changing to a straight-stitch foot and needle plate, and shorten the stitch length to 1.75 mm (15 sts/in.), before you reach for those tension dials.

This mini machine has two speeds, a small collection of accessories, and an extension table for bigger projects. It’s got beginner-friendly features, like an easy threading option. You can plug it in, or power it with batteries (handy if you’re in a location that doesn’t have outlets available).

The most common cause of a sewing machine skipping stitches is using the wrong type of needle for the fabric you are sewing. The simplest rule of thumb is that a knit fabric requires a ballpoint needle, and woven fabric requires a sharp needle—but of course, there is more to it than that. If the machine is sewing fine and you find yourself changing the needle very frequently, you should make sure you are allowing the machine to feed the fabric and that you are not forcing the fabric through the sewing process.

If you find your sewing machine having any of these common problems regularly, take a close look at your technique when operating the machine. Make sure you are letting the feed dogs do the work. Inadvertently forcing the fabric through the machine can bend the needle, which can cause a range of problems.

Sewing machine models vary in much how they weigh, with some portable options weighing as little as 3 pounds and other more heavy-duty models weighing up to 30 pounds. The weight of a sewing machine is important to consider since it may affect how portable the machine is. If you plan to take your sewing machine on the go, such as to crafting classes, quilting groups, or a friend’s house, then you may want to look for a sewing machine that is lightweight.

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