How to set up a sewing machine

How to set up a sewing machine

I was born and raised in Indonesia. I am a ready-to-wear fashion designer who had previously studied in four different countries. I have showcased my runway collection at the 2016 and 2017 Academy of Art graduation fashion show. Afterwards, I was selected by CFDA to participate in 2017 Fashion Future Graduate, which features top 85 design graduates in the US.

Semua pembayaran tidak dapat diuangkan kembali dan tidak bisa dialihkan ke workshop lain, tapi kamu boleh memberikan tiketmu ke orang lain jika kamu peserta umum. Untuk penerima Kartu Prakerja, pemindahan kepesertaan tidak berlaku. Hubungi tim kami untuk pengaturan lebih lanjut.

This article was co-authored by Daniela Gutierrez-Diaz. Daniela Gutierrez-Diaz is a professional pattern maker and clothing designer at DGpatterns in Vancouver, Canada. With over 5 years of experience, Daniela creates modern and unique silhouettes that are suitable for a busy everyday life. Her blog, On the Cutting Floor, contains sewing tips and PDF sewing patterns for a variety of projects and designs. This article has been viewed 51,888 times.

Amber, your blog and tutorials are fantastic . They are so thorough and clear. I am a beginning sewer, but I have had a few a small strokes and loss of blood flow to a few areas of my brain. It really affects the way I learn and how I perceive things. Would you ever consider doing a video version of these tutorials? I learn better by hearing and seeing rather than by reading. I am sure I can’t be the only person out there with that issue. If you did a video version, these would be absolutely amazing. Bless you and thank you for giving your time to teach others.

If you look at the Sapphire 930 above, you can see that there isn’t a lot of room to the left of the needle. While this is okay for regular sewing, there’s no place for your left hand to rest when you’re trying to control your fabric when you’re quilting. Husqvarna Viking has a gorgeous sewing table that’s easy to add to the Sapphire 930. Simply remove the tool box from the back of the sewing machine and add the table. Very quickly and easily, you just enlarged the sewing space! Why is that extra space necessary? If you want to remain in control of your work, you don’t want your quilt to be falling off the left hand side of the sewing machine. By having this space to the left of the needle, you can use both hands to control the fabric. It’s like driving –  having two hands on the steering wheel of your car gives you better control than just one.  I can’t stress this fact enough. I’ve seen students arrive at class with NO extension table. While some didn’t think it was worth it to bring the table, others don’t even have one and do not realize the importance of having one. This beautiful table by Husqvarna isn’t that big or heavy and has no feet to get broken off in transport. Perfect design to slip into your project bag.

Now, thread your machine. Using the hand wheel (or down/up button if you have one), lower your threaded needle all the way down and back up again and it should catch the bobbin thread and pull it up with the needle thread. Pull both threads to the side and close your bobbin case.

Hi! I am Amber. I’m first and foremost a mom to 4 boys. When I am not being a mom or a wife I love to bake, I love to sew, I love to read and I don’t like to sit still. Welcome to Crazy Little Projects where I show off my latest crazy projects and show you how you can do them too. Thanks for visiting!

Susan Beheler July 26, 2018 – 11:10 am I have a 690Q machine and purchased a Westlee low shank ruler foot template set. Even with a supreme slider, I am having difficulty moving the quilt and as a result I am having difficulty keeping the templates in place. It seems that there should be a way to increase the spacing between the quilt and the ruler foot. Can you help me? Thanks Reply

One other thing to note. On your machine, you will see something like this. See the lines and etchings on the sewing machine in this picture? Those are your seam guides. If a pattern tells you to sew a 1/2 inch seam, for example, you would want to line the edge of your fabric up so that it was parallel with the 1/2″ seam guide. This will make more sense as you start to sew a lot.

Hi Amber — this is SO awesome! (found via Pinterest) . . . I learned some super basic sewing stuff when I got my sewing machine before college (2004-ish?), but have always wanted to do more than just hem my pants for my short self, lol! Thank you so much for posting this

Hi I am Sydney, I am 8 years old and I want to learn how to sew. My mom has a sewing mashine and when I watched her do it I thought, “That is so cool! Oooh, that peddle thingy mabob looks fun!!!” I went on this mostly because I wanted to learn how to sew and partly because my reading log said read a blog and respond. This really helped me learn and I can’t wait to start sewing!!! P.S: I love your blog!!!

This article was co-authored by Daniela Gutierrez-Diaz. Daniela Gutierrez-Diaz is a professional pattern maker and clothing designer at DGpatterns in Vancouver, Canada. With over 5 years of experience, Daniela creates modern and unique silhouettes that are suitable for a busy everyday life. Her blog, On the Cutting Floor, contains sewing tips and PDF sewing patterns for a variety of projects and designs. There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 51,888 times.

Why is this important? If you have to stop and you’re working on a big quilt or even small blocks, if the fabric moves when you take a moment to collect yourself, then you end up with a big stitch which is time consuming to get rid of. If you stop with the needle in the quilt, then the quilt cannot move until you raise the needle. A big, big advantage to having a nice looking quilt.

Hey! i just found your blog and i know I’m a little late in taking this class. i just have a quick question. I just got a Singer Talent about two days ago, so I am super new at this, and while i was reading the book it says my machine has an automatic needle threader and I don’t have the slightest idea how to use it. i was wondering if you know how to use this and could possibly explain it a little clearer. Thank you so much for these lessons, i’m sure these will help me a lot.

When the Sapphire 930 is set to either of the free motion modes, you’ll see a prompt on the Graphic Display suggesting you drop the feed teeth. I have heard many discussions on whether or not the feed teeth should be lowered. When the feed teeth are lowered, the stitch length control is not activated. That means the stitch length is controlled by how fast the fabric is moved and the speed of the machine. More on that later. Let’s say that we left the feed teeth up. That means the stitch length is set to a certain number. Under normal circumstances the length will be consistent because the feed teeth will be evenly feeding the fabric. In the case of free motion quilting, the operator is moving the fabric so the feed teeth are doing what? Some people feel they are in more control if the feed teeth are up and if that makes them happy then leave them up. My opinion is that leaving the feed teeth up while doing free motion quilting is just providing additional wear on the feed teeth and you’re getting no benefit from that wear and tear.

Tentang Workshop Hi Learners! Ingin tahu bagaimana cara menggunakan mesin jahit dan menjahit jahitan yang bagus. Di dunia fashion, ada banyak teknik menjahit mulai dari menjahit lurus, lengkungan, dan kain yang tipis sampai tebal. Ditambah lagi finishing jahitan yang berbagai macam untuk baju/kain yang spesifik contohnya kain chiffon. Di kelas ini, Anda akan belajar mulai dari cara setup mesin jahit sampai bisa menjahit lapisan kain dengan variasi sesukamu. Mari ikuti kelas ini dan ekspresikan kreativitas Anda! Daftarkan diri Anda dan ajak teman-teman!

Elaine Theriault is a teacher, writer and pattern designer who is completely obsessed with quilting. Elaine’s Tech Tips column (originally published in A Needle Pulling Thread magazine) is now available online in e-book format at QUILTsocial.com. When not quilting, she enjoys spending time with her two dogs, Lexi and Murphy, or can be found cycling across the country. Her blog is crazyquilteronabike.blogspot.com.

About QUILTsocial QUILTsocial was created for all quilters, beginners and experts alike, to empower them with the skills, techniques, and creativity required to make quilts that will be cherished forever. Our goal is also to keep viewers abreast of new quilting products, and how to use them effectively to make quilting easier and enjoyable. Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest Youtube

Sewing machines do vary a bit from model to model, so if you happen to have your manual handy, you may want to check that out — it will likely have more specific instructions tailored to your particular machine. If you don’t have your manual, though, it’s not the end of the world! Just power the sewing machine on, take a second to familiarize yourself with the pieces, and then thread the bobbin and needle. It shouldn’t take long to get your machine completely ready to sew.

In doing a google search last night for patterns for animal hooded towels, I came upon your blog. Let me say that it is just about the best one I’ve seen for sewing projects, ideas, and tutorials. I am not a beginner sewer but I have a daughter that is and I’m referring her to your site. I purchased her a new Janome a couple years ago to help her get started (I have a 20 year old Bernina that will NOT stop, so can’t justify buying anything new for myself!). I’ve been very impressed with her Janome. Thanks so much for your great blog, your great ideas and inspiration!

If you are here because you have a new machine, I want to make sure that you know that I run a whole Learn to Sew series full of free online sewing lessons from everything you need to know to start sewing, how to sew a straight line and even which sewing machine to buy if you’re still in the market. And it’s all free. So be sure to check all of that out starting here.

Suzanne November 15, 2018 – 5:15 pm I’ve been sewing for almost 60 years and quilting for only 2, but I LOVE it! I have a different machine than yours (a Brother Innovis VQ3000), which has all of the same features as yours except the Sensor Q Foot. It’s a fabulous machine for quilting – it has an 11.25″ throat space and sews like a dream. I use the single stitch throat plate and was trying out almost every FMQ foot that came with the machine but remained frustrated with my results UNTIL I saw a posting on Pinterest which described how to change a spring foot into a floating foot. I thought, “what the heck, nothing else has worked for me so why not risk it?” I went ahead a made the change to my open toe FMQ foot and suddenly – I could do it!!!! And it was easy! My results still leave something to be desired but I’m improving and am no longer frustrated. I realized that my ancient eyes cannot “track” the needle when the foot is bouncing up and down; I was unable to focus on where I was going with the fabric. It was definitely a Eureka moment and I haven’t looked back since. Now all my FMQ feet are floating and that works perfectly for me. I know others prefer a hopping foot but I believe it’s just like anything else. Some say “to-maah-toe” and some say “to-may-toe”. We are all different, what works for one doesn’t for another but that difference is marvelous, don’t you think? If we were all the same, there wouldn’t be so many beautiful quilts in the world or lovely ideas and tips to share with one another. Thank you for your superb hints. As a relative newbie, I know I have much to learn. Reply

The machine used for this tutorial is a Janome 2030QDC. Other machines will be similar, but if you have questions, please refer to your specific machine’s manual.

David May 16, 2017 – 10:01 pm Great tips. I also have the Sapphire 930 and love it. I’m fairly new to free motion quilting. I have a large extension table (not the one that is made for the Sapphire. It’s a generic table that can be adjusted to most machines. I really like it because it’s quite large and it’s made from clear plexilglass that I also use as a light table for tracing. I also use the single hole plate. I have broken needles but that is because I kept moving the quilt the same speed while slowing the machine. Also, I was using 70/10 microtex needles because I’m using 100 # silk thread and I don’t like the large hole that larger needles leave. As for the feet and the feet settings, I do use the floating setting for floating feet but I don’t like to use the hopping setting because of the delay that the machine does after you press the pedal but before it starts moving. I just seem to have trouble getting into the rhythm with the delay. I like to press the pedal and start moving. I also always use the needle down option and I always drop my feed dogs. Again, thanks for the tips. Reply

Why is that extra space necessary? If you want to remain in control of your work, you don’t want your quilt to be falling off the left hand side of the sewing machine. By having this space to the left of the needle, you can use both hands to control the fabric. It’s like driving –  having two hands on the steering wheel of your car gives you better control than just one. 

What you need to do is take one of your empty bobbin cartridges and the thread in the color you need. On your bobbin cartridge, there will be a little hole to stick the end of your thread through. You’re going to need to look at your own manual again to see how to do this for sure on your machine. It will involve putting your thread on your spindle, wrapping it around something like this: (see the little silver button on there, you would wrap it around that once, as shown in the diagram on the machine)

This is usually an extra accessory but well worth purchasing for your sewing machine. The large oval space that comes with the general purpose stitch plate allows greater movement of your fabric during the quilting process and the stitches may not be well formed as they could be. The fabric cannot be pulled down into the bobbin case when stitching, which can distort the stitch and even result in skipped stitches. While there are other reasons why skipped stitches occur, the single hole stitch plate can help to eliminate skipped stitches.

Nope, I don’t have to do that on my machine, but that’s a good point. That’s why I want everyone to keep their manual handy too because every machine is so different.

Carrie’s machine is a beautiful basic Janome. When I asked her if I could borrow her machine to snap some pictures I didn’t know she had a Janome too, but let me just say that I love Janome. You can’t go wrong with Janome. And from what I understand, Kenmore is the baby sister of Janome and I highly recommend them too. (Kenmore is what I started on.)

When I first started to quilt, I blamed the dealer for selling me a terrible sewing machine. Someone had to take the blame for my frustration! However I learned over time, that 99% of the issues are easily fixed with a bit of knowledge, experimentation and tweaking.

This is a time when everyone is at home because of COVID -19 and I decided to take out my sewing machine that I found on craigslist for free!!! It is a 1972 Singer Stylist 518. It does not have a lot of bells and whistles but it works, and I have the manual and all the little attachments that came with the machine. I have used a newer machine in the past but thought that I needed to start from the beginning. I would like a new machine like I am sure everyone would , but it is not in my budget at this time. I just wanted to thank you Amber because I was intimidated until I started to read the beginning of your blog. I pray that I am on a journey of a lifetime!!!!

Syarat & Ketentuan Semua pembayaran tidak dapat diuangkan kembali dan tidak bisa dialihkan ke workshop lain, tapi kamu boleh memberikan tiketmu ke orang lain jika kamu peserta umum. Untuk penerima Kartu Prakerja, pemindahan kepesertaan tidak berlaku. Hubungi tim kami untuk pengaturan lebih lanjut. Segala pemberitahuan mengenai informasi dan perubahan kelas akan disampaikan langsung oleh sistem kami melalui email, harap melakukan pengecekan email secara berkala.

Amber, like many others I’ve sent my granddaughter and daughter to your blog. Hopefully, they are taking these lessons. I’m taking them myself as a refresher and would like to say what a thorough job you are doing. Thank you so much.

Welcome back! This week is going to be all about free motion quilting. To some quilters, free motion is similar to a four-letter word, but if you have the proper knowledge, you can easily build the skills necessary to quilt like a pro. I’ve got 6 tips to set up the sewing machine for free motion quilting that will make the job easier for you! I’ll be using the Husqvarna Viking Sapphire 930 for my free motion exploration. I’ll have tips on threads, needles, marking  and much much more. There’s a great project at the end of the week for you to get some practice at free motion quilting. 

I’ll have tips on threads, needles, marking  and much much more. There’s a great project at the end of the week for you to get some practice at free motion quilting. 

Sarah, you asked if a more expensive machine makes sewing easier. I have to say yes. Several years ago when I got back into sewing, I had an older Singer (1950’s) and I felt like it was doing a great job. Long story, short…..I ended up taking classes at a local Bernina dealer where you used whatever brand of machine you had. I watched those using higher end machines just breezing on thru things while I struggled with every step. It felt like I was fighting the machine all the way. Once I tried the Bernina, I was sold. Everything went so much smoother. I’m on my third Bernina (due to upgrading to get one that embroiders also) and I LOVE it. I used a Janome at a friend’s and also liked the way it ran and many of the features it had. On the other hand, I’ve used other low end machines at my two daughter’s and still can’t believe the difference. I’ve heard, Buy the best you can afford and you won’t be sorry. Amber, like many others I’ve sent my granddaughter and daughter to your blog. Hopefully, they are taking these lessons. I’m taking them myself as a refresher and would like to say what a thorough job you are doing. Thank you so much.

From all the students I have taught over the years, their biggest issue has been how to regulate the stitch length. While consistent stitch length is important, there are many, many factors that can influence the look and appeal of your free motion quilting that have nothing to do with stitch length. Many years ago when I purchased a sewing machine, I was very disappointed with the way it did free motion. I had skipped stitches, I had thread breakage, I had tension issues and I had no idea why or how to fix them. I’m going to provide you with some information that will allow you to understand why those issues occur and how to fix them – even better – how to prevent them from happening. Let’s face it – if you run into problems and don’t know how to fix them, the chances of you liking free motion are very slim. When I first started to quilt, I blamed the dealer for selling me a terrible sewing machine. Someone had to take the blame for my frustration! However I learned over time, that 99% of the issues are easily fixed with a bit of knowledge, experimentation and tweaking. Let’s get started!

Hello! I’m Tilly from Tilly and the Buttons. This blog is where we share sewing tips and inspiration, plus news about Tilly and the Buttons books, sewing patterns and online workshops. Enjoy!

I, like many others, received a new machine for Christmas. I am thrilled to begin sewing again. This machine has embroidery capabilities as well. I am excited to learn to use those options to enhance my home and my children’s homes as well.

Again – it would be great to own all three spring action feet, but I would probably be happy with the open toe free motion foot. Make sure that you have at least one spring action foot in your tool box. It can make a huge difference to the quality of your free motion stitching. Make sure that you know how to install these feet properly. Because the spring action feet work in conjunction with the movement of the needle, the arm on these spring action feet must sit over the screw that holds the needle in place. If in doubt – check with your dealer. These feet must be installed properly or they will not work!

If you look at the Sapphire 930 above, you can see that there isn’t a lot of room to the left of the needle. While this is okay for regular sewing, there’s no place for your left hand to rest when you’re trying to control your fabric when you’re quilting.

This field allows for different work environments and conditions that may affect performance. Essential operating conditions that may be present (depending on the work situation, needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) are included.

The unit of competency applies to setting up industrial sewing machines for production, conducting sample runs, problem solving, repair, adjustment, preventative maintenance and testing of machines to ensure efficient working order. The unit covers operator controlled single station industrial sewing machines and high volume automatic and manually operated hem, selvedge and embroidery sewing machines.

Welcome back! This week is going to be all about free motion quilting. To some quilters, free motion is similar to a four-letter word, but if you have the proper knowledge, you can easily build the skills necessary to quilt like a pro. I’ve got 6 tips to set up the sewing machine for free motion quilting that will make the job easier for you! I’ll be using the Husqvarna Viking Sapphire 930 for my free motion exploration.

Holding the thread loosely, push the bobbin winder to the right against the stopper. Start winding the bobbin with the foot pedal or start/stop button. Wind a short way while holding the thread. Then stop, clip the thread, and continue. The machine should stop when the bobbin is full.

I, like many others, received a new machine for Christmas. I am thrilled to begin sewing again. This machine has embroidery capabilities as well. I am excited to learn to use those options to enhance my home and my children’s homes as well. Thank you for your sewing series; I am thrilled for it to begin. You are doing a great service! Thank you!

I am a design professional graduated with BFA degree from Academy of Art University. I have worked in New York City at globally recognized brand Adam Selman and Matthew Adams Dolan. I am currently working on my own unisex athleisure sportswear brand Cleanclothesonly.com. My expertise includes womenswear design, sewing and construction, flats, digital illustration, and textile design. 

Diane H May 27, 2019 – 12:03 pm Great post! Will find and read the rest of the series. I have a single hole plate, but didn’t know it was to be used for fmq. Thanks. Reply

For those of you who think free motion is scary – this first part was pretty easy, right? Making sure you have the right tools and have the correct settings on the Sapphire 930 is the first step to having fun with free motion quilting, so hopefully, these 6 tips to set up the sewing machine for free motion quilting have helped. Join me tomorrow…I’m going to chat about thread. We’re going to look at how to thread the machine and what kind of thread to use and with which foot. Have a great day! Ciao!

Tonight I was really excited to bust out this old sewing machine that I got as a hand-me-down years ago and practice threading it. Unfortunately, I do not have the manual, and I have not had luck finding an online copy tonight. It is a Kenmore, model 385.16524000. Do you have any resources or ideas of where to look? Thanks!

Hey! i just found your blog and i know I’m a little late in taking this class. i just have a quick question. I just got a Singer Talent about two days ago, so I am super new at this, and while i was reading the book it says my machine has an automatic needle threader and I don’t have the slightest idea how to use it. i was wondering if you know how to use this and could possibly explain it a little clearer. Thank you so much for these lessons, i’m sure these will help me a lot. -Nicole

From all the students I have taught over the years, their biggest issue has been how to regulate the stitch length. While consistent stitch length is important, there are many, many factors that can influence the look and appeal of your free motion quilting that have nothing to do with stitch length.

On the front of the machine, you will find several knobs. On this particular machine, there is a knob with letters-when you turn that knob you change what type of stitch you are doing-straight stitch, zig-zag, etc. Below that you find another knob which changes the length of the stitch-are they tiny, close together stitches or long, farther apart ones? That knob determines this. To the right of both of these you find a stitch guide which shows what stitch options this machine has (and again, you would select which stitch you want to use by turning the knob at the top):

Great tips. I also have the Sapphire 930 and love it. I’m fairly new to free motion quilting. I have a large extension table (not the one that is made for the Sapphire. It’s a generic table that can be adjusted to most machines. I really like it because it’s quite large and it’s made from clear plexilglass that I also use as a light table for tracing. I also use the single hole plate. I have broken needles but that is because I kept moving the quilt the same speed while slowing the machine. Also, I was using 70/10 microtex needles because I’m using 100 # silk thread and I don’t like the large hole that larger needles leave. As for the feet and the feet settings, I do use the floating setting for floating feet but I don’t like to use the hopping setting because of the delay that the machine does after you press the pedal but before it starts moving. I just seem to have trouble getting into the rhythm with the delay. I like to press the pedal and start moving. I also always use the needle down option and I always drop my feed dogs. Again, thanks for the tips.

I have always been a fan of hand stitching, however, nowadays its pretty hard to quick and proper alteration with just your hands. I personally started using a sewing machine and my first mistake was about not taking care of thread tension. So please make sure you adjust the thread tension according to the fabric. And Amber really very helpful article, thank you for this

I know this was a posted awhile ago, but I am so glad you are keeping it up. My 9 almost 10 year old daughter has been begging me to teach her how to sew with the machine. We will both be using your site as I never really learned, just always winged it! Lol. Looking forward to your lessons and some bonding with my girl! Thanks again!

There are different styles of free motion feet that can be used depending on the type of quilting that you will be doing. There are seven feet for the Sapphire 930 and you don’t need them all, but that would be nice. I’ve provided a brief outline of what they do. You can find more information on the links to the Husqvarna Viking pages. There are also two major types of free motion feet that can be used on the Sapphire 930 and it’s very important to understand the difference between the two. There are free motion floating feet and free motion spring action feet. So what’s the difference and where do I use each of them? Free motion floating means that the free motion floating foot will float over the fabric when used at higher speeds. When the sewing machine is at a lower speed, the foot will raise and lower with each stitch to hold the fabric on the stitch plate. Free motion spring action foot works with the up and down movement of the needle thanks to a spring and an arm that sits on top of the screw for the needle. The  spring action feet work much better with thicker or specialty threads. It’s very important to have at least one floating and one spring action feet in your tool box. You would be surprised at the difference they can make to thread breakage.

Check your stitch setting. Before you begin sewing for the first time, make sure that you check your stitch setting. You can find the stitch setting by checking the knob or digital display on your sewing machine. Turn the knob or select a new stitch setting on your digital display to change the stitch setting. The basic stitch that most patterns call for is a straight stitch, which is setting number one on most machines. However, be sure to check your manual to find out if this is correct, and whether you need to make any other adjustments to use a specific stitch setting. For example, your machine may automatically adjust the tension for you, or you may need to adjust the tension manually depending on the type of machine you have. X Expert Source Daniela Gutierrez-DiazClothing Designer Expert Interview. 3 July 2019.

I, like many others, received a new machine for Christmas. I am thrilled to begin sewing again. This machine has embroidery capabilities as well. I am excited to learn to use those options to enhance my home and my children’s homes as well. Thank you for your sewing series; I am thrilled for it to begin. You are doing a great service! Thank you! Thank you again!

This is usually an extra accessory but well worth purchasing for your sewing machine. The large oval space that comes with the general purpose stitch plate allows greater movement of your fabric during the quilting process and the stitches may not be well formed as they could be. The fabric cannot be pulled down into the bobbin case when stitching, which can distort the stitch and even result in skipped stitches. While there are other reasons why skipped stitches occur, the single hole stitch plate can help to eliminate skipped stitches. Some people shy away from this stitch plate because they are afraid of breaking needles. You’ve had it happen to you – the needle flexes and catches on the stitch plate hole and breaks. That’s why we’re going to discuss needles later this week so you can understand just how much or how little flex is necessary. Needles should not be breaking and I’ll help you figure out why!

I’ve been sewing for almost 60 years and quilting for only 2, but I LOVE it! I have a different machine than yours (a Brother Innovis VQ3000), which has all of the same features as yours except the Sensor Q Foot. It’s a fabulous machine for quilting – it has an 11.25″ throat space and sews like a dream. I use the single stitch throat plate and was trying out almost every FMQ foot that came with the machine but remained frustrated with my results UNTIL I saw a posting on Pinterest which described how to change a spring foot into a floating foot. I thought, “what the heck, nothing else has worked for me so why not risk it?” I went ahead a made the change to my open toe FMQ foot and suddenly – I could do it!!!! And it was easy! My results still leave something to be desired but I’m improving and am no longer frustrated. I realized that my ancient eyes cannot “track” the needle when the foot is bouncing up and down; I was unable to focus on where I was going with the fabric. It was definitely a Eureka moment and I haven’t looked back since. Now all my FMQ feet are floating and that works perfectly for me. I know others prefer a hopping foot but I believe it’s just like anything else. Some say “to-maah-toe” and some say “to-may-toe”. We are all different, what works for one doesn’t for another but that difference is marvelous, don’t you think? If we were all the same, there wouldn’t be so many beautiful quilts in the world or lovely ideas and tips to share with one another. Thank you for your superb hints. As a relative newbie, I know I have much to learn.

Hi Learners! Ingin tahu bagaimana cara menggunakan mesin jahit dan menjahit jahitan yang bagus. Di dunia fashion, ada banyak teknik menjahit mulai dari menjahit lurus, lengkungan, dan kain yang tipis sampai tebal. Ditambah lagi finishing jahitan yang berbagai macam untuk baju/kain yang spesifik contohnya kain chiffon.

OK, you’ve done it. You bought a new sewing machine, got one for Christmas or broke the one you bought 3 years ago out of its dusty box. Now what? What are all those buttons and levers? How do you turn this thing on? What do you do now?

This unit does not cover all maintenance, repair and adjustment functions associated with industrial sewing machines. In particular, skills associated with general engineering (fitting), electrical and electronic systems, and fluid power systems, may be required according to the nature of the set-up, repair or adjustment, and the workplace practices of a particular enterprise.

Sarah, you asked if a more expensive machine makes sewing easier. I have to say yes. Several years ago when I got back into sewing, I had an older Singer (1950’s) and I felt like it was doing a great job. Long story, short…..I ended up taking classes at a local Bernina dealer where you used whatever brand of machine you had. I watched those using higher end machines just breezing on thru things while I struggled with every step. It felt like I was fighting the machine all the way. Once I tried the Bernina, I was sold. Everything went so much smoother. I’m on my third Bernina (due to upgrading to get one that embroiders also) and I LOVE it. I used a Janome at a friend’s and also liked the way it ran and many of the features it had. On the other hand, I’ve used other low end machines at my two daughter’s and still can’t believe the difference. I’ve heard, Buy the best you can afford and you won’t be sorry.

Many years ago when I purchased a sewing machine, I was very disappointed with the way it did free motion. I had skipped stitches, I had thread breakage, I had tension issues and I had no idea why or how to fix them. I’m going to provide you with some information that will allow you to understand why those issues occur and how to fix them – even better – how to prevent them from happening.

Elaine Theriault Elaine Theriault is a teacher, writer and pattern designer who is completely obsessed with quilting. Elaine’s Tech Tips column (originally published in A Needle Pulling Thread magazine) is now available online in e-book format at QUILTsocial.com. When not quilting, she enjoys spending time with her two dogs, Lexi and Murphy, or can be found cycling across the country. Her blog is crazyquilteronabike.blogspot.com.

Open Toe Stippling Foot (Floating) –  you’ll need to remove the Presser Foot Ankle to use this foot. Like the previous foot – it’s easy to see where you’re stitching as the front of the foot is open. When you bring up the bobbin thread, it’s easy to tuck those threads behind the foot. When the foot is closed, this is much harder to do.

X This article was co-authored by Daniela Gutierrez-Diaz. Daniela Gutierrez-Diaz is a professional pattern maker and clothing designer at DGpatterns in Vancouver, Canada. With over 5 years of experience, Daniela creates modern and unique silhouettes that are suitable for a busy everyday life. Her blog, On the Cutting Floor, contains sewing tips and PDF sewing patterns for a variety of projects and designs. There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 51,888 times.

Make sure you engaged the Needle Stop Up/Down function. This is imperative to achieve good free motion quilting. The Sapphire 930 has this built-in feature which is way easier than having to manually put that needle into the fabric every time you stop. Why is this important? If you have to stop and you’re working on a big quilt or even small blocks, if the fabric moves when you take a moment to collect yourself, then you end up with a big stitch which is time consuming to get rid of. If you stop with the needle in the quilt, then the quilt cannot move until you raise the needle. A big, big advantage to having a nice looking quilt. Once you start to sew or quilt with this feature, you won’t want to sew without it!

Well hello! Hi! I am Amber. I’m first and foremost a mom to 4 boys. When I am not being a mom or a wife I love to bake, I love to sew, I love to read and I don’t like to sit still. Welcome to Crazy Little Projects where I show off my latest crazy projects and show you how you can do them too. Thanks for visiting!

QUILTsocial was created for all quilters, beginners and experts alike, to empower them with the skills, techniques, and creativity required to make quilts that will be cherished forever. Our goal is also to keep viewers abreast of new quilting products, and how to use them effectively to make quilting easier and enjoyable.

Now, as I show you Carrie’s machine, keep in mind that every machine looks different, but that yours is likely to have a lot of these same parts. Have your user’s guide or manual handy so that you can refer to it since your machine is probably a little different.

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